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9th Grade

9th Grade - Honors and Standard

Read each of the following works of literature:

"The Necklace"

"Neat People vs Sloppy People"

"The History Teacher"

Directions:

1.  As you read, annotate* for evidence of irony*. You may want to consider the author's tone (attitude), the mood (feeling), and the theme (main message) of the piece.

2.  You should come prepared on THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL with your annotated texts printed.

3.  Each text must have a minimum of FIVE (5) well developed annotations that include:

a. Marking (highlighting)

b. Labeling (write the type of irony)

c. Explaining (what is the significance - special importance - to the section that you chose, and most importantly, how does it apply to the text as a whole?)

4.  You will be asked to discuss and defend your choices both verbally and in writing.

*You may click on these for further explanation of the terms.

 

9th Grade - CLUE

Jane Eyre  by Charlotte Bronte

The Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas

One More Theory About Happiness - Paul Guest (quiz - 1st week of school)


10th Grade

10th Grade - Standard

Read three books:

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

Tuesday's With Morrie by Mitch Albom

Choose one of the following:

The Skin I'm In by Sharon Flake

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas

The First Part Last by Angela Johnson

For assignment directions, visit the 10th Grade Summer Reading Website.

 
10th Grade - Honors

Read three books:


The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

Tuesday's With Morrie by Mitch Albom

Choose one of the following:

The Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morison

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah

For assignment directions, visit the 10th Grade Summer Reading Website.

 

 

10th Grade - PreAP

Pre-AP classes are required to read one book and have a second book the first day of school:

* 1984 by George Orwell (read the whole book and annotate – see below)

* Students must have a copy of Feed by M.T. Anderson the first day of class. While students are welcome to read it over the summer, we will read Feed as a class after school starts.

* You are required to create a GMAIL ACCOUNT that you will use for my class. To create the account, use the format on the attached handout.

* You are also required to sign up for a REMIND ACCOUNT. Again, the instructions are on the attached handout.

Annotating 1984 – What to look for:


Character development

* The main character is a man named Winston. Trace the development and changes of this character from the beginning of the book to the end. Be sure to note other characters and situations that Winston encounters to cause him to change, and note in what way he changes.


Conflict – internal and external

* In any good piece of fiction, conflicts are introduced in order to move the plot forward, and to convey the author’s message / theme.

* Note the introduction of various conflicts throughout the novel – these are sometimes internal (a character struggling within him/herself), and sometimes external (a character struggling with a person, force, or idea from the outside world).

* Examine how these conflicts lead to the overall theme of the novel (to do this, you will have to determine the overall theme of the novel!)

Symbolism – characters, places, objects

* Throughout the novel, characters, places, and objects are introduced to represent ideas or concepts. Identify these characters, places, and objects and note what they signify.

 

* I will be collecting your books and annotations for a grade during the first week of school!

  • This information can also be found on my website: mshanson.yolasite.com.
  • Sign up for REMIND. Information/Code is on the website.
  • If you need to email me, you can reach me at either: hansonr@scsk12.org OR mshansoncordovahs@gmail.com.
  • I will check my email frequently throughout the summer.

11th Grade

11th Grade - Standard
  • The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

One theme of the novel addresses the power of secrets. 
Create a journal/log that details who keeps secrets. 
Why? What are the secrets?  How does it affect the characters?

 

11th Grade - Honors

  • In Cold Blood by Truman Capote (ISBN 13 - 978-0679745587)
  • The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne



In Cold Blood

As you read the novel, mark key passages or sections that help support the following themes.  Be prepared to discuss/defend these themes and the passages when you return:

  • While the primary violation occurs to the Clutter family, Dick and Perry cause residual damage to the town of Holcomb. A town that was once innocent, a town that had not experienced crime, a town that did not lock its doors now faces a future filled with distrust and anxiety.  How does Capote show this?


  • Capote transforms Dick and Perry from cold-blooded murderers to humans.  By the end of the novel, the reader may have some sympathy for them. 
    Do you see them as sympathetic?  Why?  How does Capote do this?

  • Watching the movie Capote will help.  It will not replace reading the book, but it will help you understand why and how Capote wrote the novel. The movie is rated R, so clear it with your parents before watching it.

 

The Scarlet Letter

One theme of the novel addresses the power of secrets. 
Create a journal/log that details who keeps secrets. 
Why? What are the secrets?  How does it affect the characters?

 

  • Check Ms. Hanson’s website:  https://mshanson.yolasite.com OR join Chappell’s AP Language 2018.2019 website for detailed directions regarding summer reading. 
    Go to www.Edmodo.com, click “Join a Group,” and follow the instructions.  The class code is czrmzq.

 
11th Grade - AP Language and Composition
  • How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas Foster (ISBN-13: 9780060009427)
  • In Cold Blood by Truman Capote (ISBN 13 - 978-0679745587)
  • The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • A novel (fiction) published in the last five years that has not been made into a movie. 


  • Join Chappell’s AP Language 2018.2019 website for detailed directions Regarding summer reading.  Go to www.Edmodo.com, click “Join a Group,” and follow the instructions.  The class code is z7tsys.

  • Chappell’s email: chs.english.jc@gmail.com



Directions:


How to Read Literature Like a Professor

  • Return to class with a good example of a movie that is a quest.  Be prepared to discuss/defend your choices using the quest formula.

 

In Cold Blood

As you read the novel, mark key passages or sections that help support the following themes.  Be prepared to discuss/defend these themes and the passages when you return:

  • While the primary violation occurs to the Clutter family, Dick and Perry cause residual damage to the town of Holcomb. A town that was once innocent, a town that had not experienced crime, a town that did not lock its doors now faces a future filled with distrust and anxiety.  How does Capote show this?


  • Capote transforms Dick and Perry from cold-blooded murderers to humans.  By the end of the novel, the reader may have some sympathy for them. 
    Do you see them as sympathetic?  Why?  How does Capote do this?

  • Watching the movie Capote will help.  It will not replace reading the book, but it will help you understand why and how Capote wrote the novel. The movie is rated R, so clear it with your parents before watching it.

 

The Scarlet Letter

One theme of the novel addresses the power of secrets. 
Create a journal/log that details who keeps secrets. 
Why? What are the secrets?  How does it affect the characters?

 

Novel of Your Choice

The novel must have been published for the first time in the last five years but has not been made into a movie.  The movie can be in production, but it cannot be released before September 1st, 2018.  If you have already read it, that is fine.  Pick a novel you love.  My goal is to get you to read a current author.  Your job is to create a marketing strategy that convinces your classmates to read the book.  You may use Google Slides, Power Point, video, or any other school-appropriate form. Consider your audience, your message, and your relationship to/with them. Presentations should be 2 -3 minutes.  Keep it interesting.


12th Grade

12th Grade - Standard and Dual Enrollment
  • The Hero with 1000 Faces by Joseph Campbell (ISBN-13: 978-1577315933)

Students need to read these chapters to gain an understanding of the stages of the hero's journey.

We will complete a unit on this journey beginning the first week of school. *(Online research of the Stages of the Hero's Journey would be helpful)

Chapter I Departure

  1. The Call to Adventure
  2. Refusal of the Call
  3. Supernatural Aid
  4. The Crossing of the First Threshold
  5. The Belly of the Whale

Chapter II Initiation

  1. The Road of Trials
  2. The Meeting with The Goddess
  3. Woman as a Temptress
  4. Atonement with the Father
  5. Apotheosis

 Chapter III Return

     1. Rescue from Without

       2. The Crossing of the Return Threshold

       3. Master of Two Worlds

       4. Freedom to Live

Epilogue

       1. The Hero Today

 
12th Grade - AP Literature and Composition

 AP classes must read three books over the summer, OR if you attend all five days of AP Summer Camp, two books.

(Note:  AP Summer Camp is June 18th-22nd, University of Memphis campus.  You can register online:

http://tinyurl.com/APSummerCamp2018

Everyone reads:

  • Reservation Blues by Sherman Alexie
    • This American Book Award-winning novel follows the story of the rise and fall of a rock and blues band of Spokane Indians from the Spokane Reservation in Washington State. Alexie's unique combination of humor and poignancy in his writing brings forth unforgettable characters that will have you laughing one minute and crying the next!

  • Every AP student must choose two of the novels below (one if you attend camp):
    • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    • The Road by Cormac McCarthy
    • Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks
    • Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler
    • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
    • Mudbound by Hillary Jordan
    • Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
    • The Awakening by Kate Chopin
    • The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien
    • The Namesake by Jumpha Lahiri

 

Directions:

  • This summer you will keep a “reading journal” as you read these novels. Our focus will be on the theme of “journeys forward” – physical, psychological, spiritual, emotional, etc.
  • For each of the three novels, you should have a minimum of five journal entries, with each entry no shorter than two paragraphs.
  • As you are writing, consider the following:
    • What journeys are present in this novel?
    • How do the characters change and develop as a consequence of their journey? Is the change positive or negative?
    • What do the different characters represent?
    • What qualities do you see in a character that either support or hinder her/him on her/his journey?
    • In what ways do you relate to the character’s journey?
    • What connections can you make between the journey you are reading about currently and the journeys from novels you have previously read?
    • What are the challenges and trials along the way? Do you find these challenges realistic? Why?
    • What is it about the journey that either draws you in or repels you?
    • What does the journey portrayed in the novel say about the human condition?
  • Ultimately, your journal entries should be a reflection of how you viewed the journey that takes place in the novel. The questions above are a guideline only.

  • Your journals will be due on the third day of school, August 8th. You may submit them in any of the following ways:
    • Hard copy format in a notebook, turned in during class
    • As an email attachment prior to your class period on August 8th, sent to: mrscurleysenglishclass@gmail.com
    • As blog posts on a self-created “readers journey” blog (you MUST send me the link prior to class on August 8th)

This assignment will comprise your first grade of the quarter and will be graded based on:

    • Quality of thought and insight in the responses
    • Adherence to assignment guidelines and due date
    • Quality of syntax and diction in the responses

Be sure to review your copy of How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster. If you do not have a copy, see me to check one out. 

**Note:  if you have not previously read this book, then it is additional REQUIRED reading for the summer (sorry!).

 

Sample Journal Entry                                                                                                          4/30/18

Novel:            Siddhartha by Herman Hesse

Siddhartha is on a journey of self-discovery.  You can see this easily when he goes from being in the country, where he is satisfied and happy, to being in the city, where he becomes discontent and lustful.  This contrast mirrors a stage of life many people go through.  It’s akin to the question “How much is enough?”  Siddhartha was completely tranquil and happy when he lived his simple life in the country.  He didn’t “desire” material possessions because no one there had them.  He simply lived his monk-style life and was happy and content.  But somehow, that life wasn’t enough for him, and he felt “called” to travel and enlighten others.

When Siddhartha began his journey, he had the very best of intentions.  He spent the majority of his time engaging with people and in conversation about scriptures and the gods.  When he finally reached the city, however, he changed in a negative way.  His eyes were opened to materialism and to lust.  He fell in “love”, well not love actually, it was more like he fell in “lust” with a courtesan who taught him about the pleasures of the flesh.  She also introduced him to people who helped him attain material wealth.  Once you start amassing material possessions, it is never easy to give them up, and usually people just want more and more.  Some people end up in a cycle of always wanting more, and are never satisfied.  It sort of reminds me of when I lived on a boat for a year.  All of my “stuff” was put in storage because boats are small and possessions are prized.  I had time for so many more things like reading and spending time with people I cared about because I wasn’t so busy taking care of “stuff.”   I wonder if Siddhartha will encounter a point of realization and return his former ways, or if he will be taken over by hedonism……………..



 
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